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Abstract:

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CEP BREXIT Analysis
BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance
Holger Breinlich, Swati Dhingra, Saul Estrin, Hanwei Huang, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth June 2016
Paper No' CEPBREXIT08:
Full Paper (pdf)

Tags: brexit; eu referendum; uk economy; uk politics; trade; foreign investment; growth; productivity; immigration; wages; labour

On June 23rd, the British people will vote in a referendum over whether or not to remain in the European Union. It is the most important vote that most of us will have in our lifetimes. And one that will have major repercussions for our country and the rest of the world for decades, if not generations, to come. Ever since David Cameron made his Bloomberg speech in January 2013 promising the Referendum, I knew that this was likely to become the major issue. I was lucky enough to be able to put a team together at the CEP of the world’s top researchers on international trade,labour markets and growth. We were able to develop the new methods, theories and data to address the deep and complex problem of the economic consequences of a decision to leave an alliance we had been a key member of for over 40 years. We published several reports over the last three years on the Brexit debate, especially in the last three months, and this book is a selection of the fruits of our labour.